A Ukrainian mother and child arrive in Monterey amid the Russian war

A Ukrainian mother, son and unborn daughter have arrived on the Central Coast after fleeing their home in Odessa, Ukraine amid the war in Russia. They join millions of other Ukrainian refugees who have left their homes since the war began on February 20. Liza Nerubayska, who is five months pregnant, fled Ukraine with her 14-month-old son Elder. On Sunday, she shared her story of becoming a refugee with the help of her sister Lana Poklad. “She was thinking for several days, then when she was working with the baby, she heard the loud explosion and it was her decision to leave the country,” said Poklad, who translated for her sister. Nerubayska chose to come to the Central Coast because her sister lives in Monterey. The trip from Odessa to the central coast took more than a month. First, Nerubayska and her son crossed the Romanian border. Her husband stayed to fight against the Russian army. “She was confused and she didn’t know what to do, but above all she understands that her life will not be the same and above all that she has to think about her child at this moment and her future baby,” Poklad said. Once Nerubayska left Ukraine safely, her sister met her in Romania where they spent weeks trying to get a visa to enter the United States. An attempt that probably would have failed without the help of Congressman Jimmy Panetta “We were able to do this by working with the Romanian Embassy and making sure they had the proper support and we wrote this letter,” said said Representative Panetta. “Fortunately it worked obviously, that’s the kind of stuff we do for our constituents and their family members and especially in a situation that’s happening in Ukraine.” Nerubayska also received help from St. Angela Merici Catholic Parish in Pacific Grove. “We raised her in prayer,” Reverend Peter Crivello said. “We’ve helped fund some expenses and we’ve been doing collections here for Catholic Relief Services since almost the first days they were on the ground in Ukraine.” In addition, they also support his son and his granddaughter who will be born this summer. “We were able to have a box of beautiful clothes and all sorts of other things,” said Anne Kelley of the Christ Child Society of Monterey Bay. “We have nappies coming in today in his size and we have blankets, there’s a high chair, there’s a premium car seat and whatever else will help get started.” The Nerubayska visa is valid until September. Although she is grateful to be in the United States, she is desperate to find her husband in Odessa. “She said that even though she’s on the other side of this globe, she’s still together,” Poklad translated. people and she thinks we have to fight because the truth is on our side.”

A Ukrainian mother, son and unborn daughter have arrived on the Central Coast after fleeing their home in Odessa, Ukraine, amid war with Russia.

They join millions of other Ukrainian refugees who have left their homes since the war began on February 20.

Five-month-pregnant Liza Nerubayska fled Ukraine with her 14-month-old son Elder. On Sunday, she shared her story of becoming a refugee with the help of her sister Lana Poklad.

“She was thinking for several days, then when she was working with the baby, she heard the loud explosion and it was her decision to leave the country,” said Poklad, who translated for her sister.

Nerubayska chose to come to the Central Coast because her sister lives in Monterey.

The trip from Odessa to the central coast took more than a month. First, Nerubayska and her son crossed the Romanian border. Her husband stayed to fight against the Russian army.

“She was confused and she didn’t know what to do, but above all she understands that her life will not be the same and above all that she has to think about her child at this moment and her future baby,” Poklad said. .

Once Nerubayska left Ukraine safely, her sister met her in Romania where they spent weeks trying to get a visa to enter the United States. A venture that probably would have failed without the help of Congressman Jimmy Panetta.

“We were able to do that by working with the Romanian Embassy and making sure they had the proper support and we wrote this letter,” Rep. Panetta said. “Fortunately it worked obviously, these are the types of things that we do for our constituents and their family members and especially in a situation that is happening in Ukraine.”

Nerubayska also received help from the Catholic parish of St. Angela Merici in Pacific Grove.

“We raised her in prayer,” Reverend Peter Crivello said. “We’ve helped fund some expenses and taken collections here for Catholic Relief Services since almost the first days they were on the ground in Ukraine.”

Additionally, they are also providing support for her son and baby girl who will be born this summer.

“We were able to get a box of nice clothes and all sorts of other things,” said Anne Kelley of Christ Child Society of Monterey Bay. “We have nappies coming in today in his size and we have blankets, there’s a high chair, there’s a premium car seat and whatever else will help get started.”

The Nerubayska visa is valid until September.

Although she is grateful to be in the United States, she is desperate to find her husband in Odessa.

“She said that even though she’s on the other side of this globe, she’s still together,” Poklad translated. “Her heart is always with the Ukrainian people and she thinks we have to fight because the truth is on our side.”